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Paddy JUPURRURLA NELSONPaddy JAPALJARRI SIMSKwentwentjay JUNGURRAYI SPENCER, Yanjilypiri Jukurrpa (Star Dreaming) REDUCE 1/1


Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art
Desert Painting from 1975 gallery See nearby items (accurate to +/- 12 hrs)
ON DISPLAY
LVL 1

Paddy JUPURRURLA NELSON

Warlpiri people

Australia 1919 – 1999

Paddy JAPALJARRI SIMS

Warlpiri people

Australia 1917 – 2010

Kwentwentjay JUNGURRAYI SPENCER

Warlpiri people

Australia 1919 – 1990

Yanjilypiri Jukurrpa (Star Dreaming) 1985 synthetic polymer paint on canvas synthetic polymer paint on canvas
372 h x 171.4 w cm
Purchased 1986
Accession No: NGA 86.1798
© Kwentwentjay Jungurrayi Spencer. Licensed by Viscopy © Paddy Jupurrurla Nelson. Licensed by Viscopy © Paddy Japaljarri Sims. Licensed by Viscopy

  • The Warlpiri-speaking community of Yuendumu lies approximately 100 kilometres north of Papunya in the Northern Territory. It was established in 1946 by the Australian government to deliver rations and welfare services to Aboriginal people in the surrounding district. Yuendumu was the first Aboriginal community in the Western Desert region to begin painting for the art market, after Papunya. Senior Warlpiri men knew of developments at Papunya in the 1970s, but were reluctant to paint for the public domain. In the early 1980s, the first artists at Yuendumu to produce paintings were Warlpiri women. Then, in 1983, a group of senior men including Paddy Sims, Larry Spencer and Paddy Nelson, painted the 30 doors of the local school with Jukurrpa images to remind the students of their traditional education. The project encouraged this senior group and other Warlpiri artists to paint on canvas on a large scale for exhibition. Within two years they had established their own art centre, Warlukurlangu Artists.

    Yanjilypiri Jukurrpa (Star Dreaming) 1985 is one of the first large canvases to emerge from Yuendumu. This magnificent work by three senior Warlpiri men relates to the fire ceremony of the Warlpiri, and is associated with the creation of the constellations. While the artists remained circumspect about the deeper levels of interpretation of the imagery, they described the dominant central motif as a ceremonial ground painting upon which the Fire Ceremony is performed. Participants shake smouldering branches and the embers float into the night sky to create the constellations represented by the circles and stars surrounding the ground painting. In turn, the ground painting can be seen as an evocation of the earth.

    A feature of Yuendumu paintings is that many are produced collaboratively. Contributors are involved as either kirda (owners of the Jukurrpa through the patrilineal line) or as kurdungurlu (managers of the Jukurrpa through the matrilineal line). Jimija Jungurrayi Spencer (1908–1989), the owner of the Star Dreaming, supervised this painting but did not participate. The main painter was Paddy Nelson who had matrilineally-inherited rights to the Dreaming. Paddy Sims and Jimija’s younger brother, Larry Spencer, assisted.

    Franchesca Cubillo


    Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2010
    From: Franchesca Cubillo and Wally Caruana (eds) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art: collection highlights National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2010

  • One of the first large canvases to emerge from Yuendumu, north-west of Alice Springs, this magnificent work by three senior Warlpiri men pertains to the fire ceremony of the Warlpiri people, which is associated with the creation of the constellations. While the artists have wished not to say more about it, clearly it shares in the approach by desert painters generally, in which the events that took place in ancestral times are portrayed through signs and icons within an aerial view of the landscape.

    The painting is based on ceremonial ground paintings, and like ground paintings is a collaborative work by several artists. Kwentwentjay Jungurrayi Spencer, owner of the Dreaming/Tjukurrpa, supervised the painting but did not participate. The main painter was Paddy Jupurrurla Nelson, a leading artist in the community who had matrilineally inherited rights to the Dreaming/Tjukurrpa. Paddy Japaljarri Sims and Kwentwentjay Jungurrayi Spencer’s younger brother, Larry Jungurrayi Spencer, assisted.


    Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2010
    From: Ron Radford (ed), Collection highlights: National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2008

  • The Warlpiri-speaking community at Yuendumu (approximately 100 kilometres north of Papunya in the Northern Territory) was initially reluctant to follow developments at Papunya in the 1970s, where Western Desert artists began to paint for the public domain. Warlpiri women were the first to produce paintings; then, in 1983, a group of senior Warlpiri men, including Paddy Jupurrurla Nelson, Paddy Japaljarri Sims and Larry Jungurrayi Spencer, painted the doors of the local school with Jukurrpa (Dreaming) images. The project encouraged this senior group and other Warlpiri artists to paint on canvas on a large scale for exhibition and, within two years, they had established their own art centre.

    One of the first large canvases to emerge from the community, this magnificent work pertains to the fire ceremony of the Warlpiri people, which is associated with the creation of the constellations. The work shares in the approach by Western Desert painters generally, in which the events that took place in ancestral times are portrayed through signs and icons in an aerial view of the landscape.

    The painting is based on ceremonial ground paintings and, like them, is a collaborative work. Jimija Jungurrayi Spencer, owner of this Jukurrpa, supervised the painting but did not participate. The main painter was Paddy Jupurrurla Nelson, a leading artist in the community who had matrilineally inherited rights to the Jukurrpa. Paddy Japaljarri Sims and Jimija Jungurrayi Spencer’s younger brother, Larry Jungurrayi Spencer, assisted.


    Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2014
    From: Collection highlights: National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2014

  • Yuendumu community is best known for the production of large collaborative works involving several artists. Contributors are involved as either owners (kirda) or managers (kurdungurlu). The use of a vivid palette is also an identifying feature of work emanating from Yuendumu. The expression of the narrative is akin to the approach by desert painters generally, where an aerial view of the landscape and the events that took place in ancestral times is expressed through a painted language of signs and icons.

    One of the first large-scale canvases to emerge from Yuendumu, Yanjilypiri Jukurrpa(Star Dreaming) is the work of three Warlpiri men. This magnificent work pertains to the fire ceremony of the Warlpiri people, associated with the creation of the constellations. Further information about this work is restricted, the owners of the image preferring not to divulge a full description. The collaboration of several artists reflects how ceremonial ground drawings are made, on which this work is based. Whilst Jimmy Jungarayi Spencer, owner of the Dreaming, supervised the painting, he did not participate. The main painter was Paddy Jupurrurla Nelson, a leading artist in the community who has matrilineally inherited rights to the Dreaming. Paddy Japaljarri Sims and Jimmy Jungarrayi Spencer’s younger brother, Larry Jungarrayi Spencer, assisted.

    Susan Jenkins


    Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2010
    From: Anne Gray (ed), Australian art in the National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2002

  • 杰普卢拉·内尔森·帕迪 (JUPURRURLA NELSON, Paddy)
    加帕加瑞·辛穆斯·帕迪 (JAPALJARRI SIMS, Paddy)
    杰古拉伊·斯本塞·肯温杰 (JUNGURRAYI SPENCER, Kwentwentjay)
    《严吉利皮瑞·杰库帕(星宿梦幻)》(Yanjilypiri Jukurrpa (Star Dreaming))
    1985年
    帆布材质,合成聚合颜料
    372.00(高) x 171.40(宽)厘米
    1986年购买
    86.1798

    讲沃尔普瑞(Warlpiri)语的杨登默(Yuendumu)社区位于北领地(Northern Territory)帕普尼亚(Papunya)以北约100公里处。该居民点由澳大利亚政府于1946年建立,目的是为周围地区的原住民民众配送定额和福利服务。杨登默是继帕普尼亚后,西部沙漠地区为艺术市场绘制画作的第一个原住民社区。沃尔普瑞男性长老了解1970年代帕普尼亚的发展,但他们不愿为大众画画。1980年代初,首批绘制画作的杨登默艺术家是妇女。后来到了1983年,一群包括帕迪·辛穆斯、拉里·斯宾塞和帕迪·内尔森在内的长老用杰库帕图像在当地学校的30道门上作画,提醒学生时时记住自己的传统教育。老年团队和其他沃尔普瑞艺术家从中受到鼓励,开始大规模在帆布上绘画,用于展出。两年之内,他们成立了自己的艺术中心Warlukurlangu艺术家中心。

    创作于1985年的《严吉利皮瑞·杰库帕(星宿梦幻)》是首批现身于杨登默的大尺寸帆布画之一。这幅由年沃尔普瑞三位男性长老完成的巨作与沃尔普瑞火祭祀有关,与星座的创造有联系。尽管艺术家对意象的深层解读依然审慎,但他们把起支配地位的核心主题描绘为供火祭祀举行的祭祀地面画。参与者挥舞发烟燃烧的树枝,余烬飘入夜空,在地面画四周形成用圆圈和星星代表的星座。反过来,地面画可以看成是对地球的招魂。

    杨登默绘画的一大特色是,很多画是集体创作完成的。合作者参与的身份要么是Kirda(父系血统的杰库帕拥有者),要么是kurdungurlu(母系血统的杰库帕管理者)。星宿梦幻拥有者吉米加·杰古拉伊·斯宾塞(1908–1989)指导了这幅画,但没有参与绘制工作。帕迪·内尔森主画,他拥有梦幻的母系继承权。帕迪·辛穆斯和吉米加的弟弟拉里·斯宾塞协助完成画作。

    Franchesca Cubillo
    弗兰切西卡·库比尤


    Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2010