Gwyn H. PIGOTT, Pale still life with teapot Enlarge 1 /1

Gwyn PIGOTT

Ballarat, Victoria, Australia 1935 – London, United Kingdom 2013

  • Britain from 1955-1965, France from 1966-1973

Pale still life with teapot 2002 Description: 8-part group
Place made: Booval, Queensland, Australia
Materials & Technique: ceramics, glazed porcelain

Dimensions: overall 19.5 h x 74.0 w x 20.0 d cm
Acknowledgement: Gift of Raphy Star
Accession No: NGA 2005.235.A-H

Gwyn Hanssen Pigott concentrates on the subject of the functional vessel, investigating its subtleties and nuances. Exploring the format of the group, she presents variations on related forms of vases, beakers, bowls and teapots as still lifes. Wheel-thrown in porcelain and using variations of wood-fired celadon glazes, Pigott’s approach to composition and presentation in these deceptively simple forms of grouped, functional objects reflect the influence of Italian painter Giorgio Morandi. Pale still life with teapot is presented as a linear progression of vessels, the tonal variation of each further revealed as the viewer comes closer to examine the effect of light and translucency on the tapering edges of the porcelain forms. A contemplative work of subtle beauty, this is an elegant distillation of Pigott’s understanding of ceramics and the nuances of placement.


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra

Gwyn Hanssen Pigott was one of Australia's most distinguished potters. Pigott concentrated on the subject of the functional vessel, investigating its subtleties and nuances. Exploring the format of the group, she presented variations on related forms of vases, beakers, bowls and teapots as still lifes. Using wheel-thrown porcelain and variations of wood-fired celadon glazes, Pigott’s approach to composition and presentation in these deceptively simple forms of grouped, functional objects reflect the influence of Italian painter Giorgio Morandi. Pale still life with teapot is presented as a linear progression of vessels, the tonal variation of each further revealed as the viewer comes closer to examine the effect of light and translucency on the tapering edges of the porcelain forms. A contemplative work of subtle beauty, this is an elegant distillation of Pigott’s understanding of ceramics and the nuances of placement.


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2014
From: Collection highlights: National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2014