Andy WARHOLSALVATORE SILKSCREEN COMPANYFACTORY ADDITIONS, Campbell's Soup I Enlarge 1 /1

Andy WARHOL

United States of America 1928 – 1987

artist

SALVATORE SILKSCREEN COMPANY

printer (organisation)

FACTORY ADDITIONS

publisher (organisation)

Campbell's Soup I 1968 Description: a portfolio of 10 colour screenprints
Place made: New York, New York, United States of America
Materials & Technique: prints, stencil screenprint, printed in coloured inks. Support: white paper
Impression: 150/250
Edition: edition 250, plus 26 artist's proofs A-Z
Publisher: FACTORY ADDITIONS
Place Published: New York
Date Published: 1968

Edition Notes: printed by Salvatore Silkscreen Co. Inc., New York
Primary Insc: each print is signed verso, lower right hand corner, in ball point pen 'Andy Warhol'
Secondary Insc: each print is stamped, verso, lower right hand corner '150/250'
Dimensions: sheet (each) 91.8 h x 61.3 w cm overall 183.6 h x 306.5 w cm
Cat Raisonné: Feldman, Frayda & Defendi, Claudia. 1997. Andy Warhol Prints: A Catalogue Raisonné, cat. II.44-53, p.72-73
Acknowledgement: The Poynton Bequest 2006
Accession No: NGA 2006.859.1-11
Image rights: © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./ARS. Licensed by Viscopy

Andy Warhol was a significant figure in the American Pop Art movement of the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. This was an art style notable for its subject matter—drawn from popular culture, including film, television, advertisements, newspapers and magazines—and for its adoption of mass-production techniques such as screenprinting.

Warhol’s subjects resonated because of their familiarity. Well-known figures appeared in his work—including Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley, Mick Jagger, Chairman Mao and Muhammad Ali—as did everyday consumer products, such as the ubiquitous Campbell’s Soup can. The repetitive nature of many of Warhol’s compositions, and their execution using commercial production techniques like screenprinting, gave his art the qualities of an assembly line.

Warhol began his images of Campbell’s Soup cans in late 1961, presenting them both individually and in series. That a soup can could be the subject of an artwork astonished everybody, and Warhol became an instant star.

Warhol continued to develop this theme in his paintings and in two series of prints in 1968 and 1969 featuring different soup flavours. Campbell’s Soup 1 in the collection of the National Gallery of Australia, notable for its brilliant colour and banal subject matter, has become a Pop Art icon.


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2010
From: Ron Radford (ed), Collection highlights: National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2008

Andy Warhol was a significant figure in the American Pop Art movement of the 1950s, 60s and 70s. This was an art style notable for its subject matter—drawn from popular culture, including film, television, advertisements, newspapers and magazines—and for its adoption of mass-production techniques such as screenprinting.

Warhol’s subjects resonated because of their familiarity. Well-known figures appeared in his work—including Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley, Mick Jagger, Chairman Mao and Muhammad Ali—as did everyday consumer products, such as the ubiquitous Campbell’s Soup can. The repetitive nature of many of Warhol’s compositions, and their execution using commercial production techniques, gave his art the qualities of an assembly line.

Warhol began his images of Campbell’s Soup cans in late 1961, presenting them both individually and in series. That a soup could be the subject of an artwork astonished everybody, and Warhol became an instant star.

Warhol continued to develop this theme in his paintings and in two series of prints in 1968 and 1969 featuring different soup flavours. Campbell’s Soup 1 in the collection of the National Gallery of Australia, notable for its brilliant colour and banal subject matter, has become a Pop Art icon.


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2014
From: Collection highlights: National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2014