Unknown ARTIST, Jawun [Bicornual basket] Enlarge 1 /2
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Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art
19th Century Objects gallery See nearby items

On display on Level 1

Unknown ARTIST

Rainforest people

Australia Unknown – Unknown

Jawun [Bicornual basket] 19th - 20th Century Place made: Rainforest Region, Queensland, Australia
Materials & Technique: fibrework, baskets, natural earth pigments on lawyer cane

Dimensions: 45.0 h x 46.0 w x 22.0 d cm
Acknowledgement: Purchased 2005
Accession No: NGA 2005.598

Jawun are bicornual (or two-horned) baskets unique to the rainforest area of the eastern coast of Cape York Peninsula, from Cooktown in the north to the Cardwell area in the south. They are made by men and women of the Jirrbal people and neighbouring groups. The jawun painted with natural earth pigments in traditional designs were intended to be used in ceremony, funerals or for exchange. The designs relate to those painted onto rainforest shields. Jawun have a variety of purposes: they are used as carrying baskets; as fish-traps in rivers, where the horns of the basket are wedged between sticks or rocks; and as sieves to leach out toxic substances from a variety of bush foods. The larger jawun were also used for carrying babies.

The basket is made up of numerous horizontal segments which are connected by an intricate and fine linear weave using thin strips of lawyer cane. The painted bands of red and white ochres are divided by black charcoal lines and, although faded, hint at the intensity and richness of colours that would have adorned this basket in its original state. The basket lacks handles—normally jawun have two handles, one short and a long looped handle which would have allowed the carrier to strap it around their forehead, freeing their hands to collect bush foods. This basket is a fine example of the Indigenous technology—the geometric precision of its construction renders it almost architectural in design.

Wally Caruana


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2010
From: Franchesca Cubillo and Wally Caruana (eds) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art: collection highlights National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2010

Jawun bicornual (two-horned) baskets are unique to the rainforest area of the eastern coast of Cape York Peninsula, from Cooktown in the north to the Cardwell area in the south. Jawun painted with natural earth pigments in traditional designs were used in ceremony, funerals or for exchange. The designs are related to those painted onto rainforest shields in the region. Jawun are used as carrying baskets, as fish-traps in rivers (the horns of the basket are wedged between sticks or rocks) and as sieves to leach out toxic substances from a variety of bush foods. The larger jawun were also used for carrying babies.

The basket is made up of horizontal segments that are connected by an intricate and fine linear weave using thin strips of lawyer cane. This basket lacks handles—normally jawun have two handles to allow the carrier to strap it around their forehead, freeing their hands to collect bush foods. The jawun is a fine example of Indigenous technology—the geometric precision of its construction renders it almost architectural in design.


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2014
From: Collection highlights: National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2014

艺术家:未知
《加闻(双角篮)》(Jawun (Bicornual basket))
19-20世纪
藤条编织,天然色料
45.00(高) x 46.00(宽) x 22.00(深)厘米
2005年购买
2005.598

加闻(Jawun)是一种双角(或两角)蓝,是约克角半岛(Cape York Peninsula)东海岸北起库克镇(Cooktown)南至卡德威尔(Cardwell)雨林地区的特有物品。它们是由杰巴尔(Jirrbal)人男女和邻近部族人编制的。用天然色料以传统图案装饰的加闻适用于仪式、葬礼或用于交换。图案与雨林盾牌上的图案有关。加闻用途多种多样:它们被用作搬运用篮子;在河里,篮子的两个角固定在木桩或岩石间,用作捕鱼器;用作筛子将丛林食物中的有毒物质滤掉。大一点的加闻也用来背婴儿。

篮子的编织使用了众多水平段,用名叫省藤的细藤条采用复杂精细的线性织法连接水平段。红白天然色料作色带中加夹着黑炭线条,尽管已经退色,还能依稀想象篮子原始装饰色彩的鲜艳和丰富。篮子没有把手,通常情况下加闻有两个把手,一长一短的环形把手让搬运者将篮子套在额头上,腾出双手采摘丛林食物。本篮子是土著人技术的一个典范,结构的几何精度使其几乎具备了建筑设计。

Wally Caruana
瓦里·卡鲁阿那


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra