Lorna Brown NAPANANGKA, Grandfather's Country at Warren Creek Enlarge 1 /1

Lorna Brown NAPANANGKA

Pintupi/Luritja peoples

Haasts Bluff, Northern Territory, Australia born 1961

Grandfather's Country at Warren Creek 2005 Place made: Papunya, Western Desert, Northern Territory, Australia
Materials & Technique: paintings, synthetic polymer paint on canvas

Dimensions: 183.0 h x 152.5 w cm
Acknowledgement: Gift of Rupert and Annabel Myer in honour of his parents Sarah and Baillieu Myer
Accession No: NGA 2006.289
Image rights: © the artist licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency Ltd

The golden yellow background in this work is covered in a myriad of sections of design elements common in the visual language of the desert: concentric circles indicating sacred sites and other places; journey lines joining these; and clusters of U-shapes to represent people or ancestors in human form. It is a complex composition that suggests a visual narrative connected to the all-powerful Tingari ancestors and their creative acts in Lorna Brown Napanangka’s grandfather’s country at Warren Creek, which she is entitled to paint. The shapes represent the creek, rockholes, soakage waters and sandhills in the area. During ancestral times, a large group of women camped at Warren Creek and gathered the edible berries and fruit growing in the vicinity. These included kampurarrpa (desert raisin), ili (desert fig), ipalu (bush banana) and pura (bush tomato). They also dug for ngari (honey ants) and maku (witchetty grubs).

Born in the desert near the Aboriginal settlement of Haasts Bluff, Lorna Brown Napanangka was taken by her mother Annie Ellis and family, including her grandfather Obed Raggett, to Papunya when Napanangka was just a few months old. After two years her family moved back to Haasts Bluff before later moving to Warren Creek outstation near Mount Liebig. In 1971, Obed Raggett was the assistant to the teacher Geoffrey Bardon when the latter encouraged the elder men to paint for the public domain, thus initiating the painting movement at Papunya.

Wally Caruana


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2010
From: Franchesca Cubillo and Wally Caruana (eds) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art: collection highlights National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2010

This work’s golden yellow background is overlaid with stippled cream lines, joined into a myriad of sections, evoking Tingari cycle stories, sacred sites and regions in the artist’s grandfather’s country. The shapes represent the creek, rockholes, soakage waters and sandhills in the area. During creation times, a large group of ancestral women camped at Warren Creek and gathered the edible berries and fruit growing in the vicinity. These included kampurarrpa (desert raisin), ili (desert fig), ipalu (bush banana) and pura (bush tomato). They also dug for ngari (honey ants) and maku (witchetty grubs).

Born in the desert near Haasts Bluff, Lorna Brown Napanangka was taken by her mother Annie Ellis and family, including grandfather Obed Raggett, to Papunya when Lorna was just a few months old. After two years her family moved back to Haasts Bluff before later moving to Warren Creek outstation near Mt Liebig. Obed Raggett was the teacher’s assistant to Geoffrey Bardon at the Papunya School in 1971. The construction and the exuberance of her work suggest that as a child Lorna observed the senior artists working at Papunya in 1971–72.


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2010
From: Ron Radford (ed), Collection highlights: National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2008

The golden yellow background of this work is overlaid with stippled cream lines joined into a myriad of sections, evoking stories of the all-powerful Tingari ancestors and their creative acts in the artist’s grandfather’s country at Warren Creek, which she is entitled to paint. The shapes represent the creek, rockholes, soakage waters and sandhills in the area. During creation times a large group of ancestral women camped at Warren Creek and gathered the edible berries and fruit growing in the vicinity. These included kampurarrpa (desert raisin), ili (desert fig), ipalu (bush banana) and pura (bush tomato). They also dug for ngari (honey ants) and maku (witchetty grubs).

Lorna Brown Napanangka was born in the desert near Haasts Bluff in the Northern Territory. When she was a few months old she was taken to nearby Papunya by her mother, Annie Ellis, along with members of the family including her grandfather, Obed Raggett. After two years the family returned to Haasts Bluff before later moving to Warren Creek outstation near Mt Liebig. In 1971 Raggett was the assistant to the teacher Geoffrey Bardon at Papunya school, just at the time Bardon was encouraging the senior men to paint for the public domain—thus initiating the Western Desert painting movement at Papunya.


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2014
From: Collection highlights: National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2014

洛娜·布朗·纳帕南卡 (Lorna Brown Napanangka)
《祖父在沃伦溪的家乡》(Grandfather's Country at Warren Creek)
2005年
澳大利亚北领地西部沙漠帕普尼亚
帆布材质,合成聚合物涂料
183.0 (高) x 152.5 (宽)厘米
鲁伯特和安娜贝尔·迈尔给父母萨拉和贝利欧·迈尔的献礼
收录号:NGA 2006.289
©土著艺术家协会特许艺术家

这幅作品的底色为金黄色,上面饰有大量常见于沙漠视觉语言的设计元素片段:同心圆符号表明神圣的场所及其他地方;旅行线路与此相连;群集的“U”字形代表人或人形祖先。构图复杂,以视觉叙述讲述了全能的廷加瑞(Tingari)祖先以及他们在洛娜·布朗·纳帕南卡祖父的家乡沃伦溪开展创造性活动的情形,她享有这片土地的绘画特权。图形代表这一地区的溪流、岩洞、浸水区和沙丘。祖先时期,成群结队的妇女在沃伦溪边宿营,采摘附近生长的食用浆果和水果。这些包括kampurarrpa (沙漠葡萄)、ili (沙漠无花果)、ipalu (森林香蕉)和pura (森林西红柿)。她们也寻找ngari(蜜蚁)和maku (木蠹蛾幼虫)。

洛娜·布朗·纳帕南卡出生于土著集聚地Haasts Bluff附近的沙漠,只有几个月大的时候,由母亲安妮·埃利斯(Annie Ellis)及包括祖父奥贝德·拉格特(Obed Raggett)在内的家人带到帕普尼亚。两年后,她们一家搬回到Haasts Bluff,之后又迁往李比希山附近的沃伦溪边防所。1971年,奥贝德·拉格特(Obed Raggett)担任杰弗里·巴尔东(Geoffrey Bardon)的助教,后者鼓励年事已高的奥贝德为大众作画,从而开启了帕普尼亚绘画运动。

Wally Caruana
瓦里·卡鲁阿那


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra

Description

This is a painting by Pintupi/Luritja artist Lorna Brown Napanangka (1961-) depicting her grandfather’s country at Warren Creek in the Northern Territory. The painting is shown as an enlargeable image and in a video. Text onscreen gives information about Napanangka’s life and painting, as it describes the complex design elements of the work. The video soundtrack tells of the ancestral story of the land, describing the activities of the ancestral women on the land during creation times. The painting measures 183.0 cm high x 152.5 cm wide and was painted with synthetic polymer paint on canvas.

Educational value

  • This is an excellent resource for the Responding strand in the 7-8 year bands in the visual arts curriculum, especially for those content descriptions that refer to considering the broader context of works of art, such as their social, cultural and historical context.  It may also be useful for teachers of history in year 3 and 4 particularly in relation to content descriptions about the importance of connection to Country for Aboriginal peoples.
  • The work is of considerable significance for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures cross-curriculum priority. It exemplifies one of the priority’s organising ideas in relation to Aboriginal peoples: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have unique belief systems and are spiritually connected to the land, sea, sky and waterways. The resource as a whole connects to another organising idea: Australia acknowledges the significant contributions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people locally and globally. Napanangka’s grandfather, Obed Raggett played a significant role in initiating the Western Desert painting movement at Papunya.

Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra