Mewar kingdom Rajasthan, India, Udaipur
Maharana Jawan Singh hunting c. 1830 Place made: Udaipur, Rajasthan, India
Materials & Technique: paintings, opaque watercolour, gold and ink on cotton
Primary Insc: Inscribed on the front borders: "Kimat rupiya 350"; "Kimat 450"; "Shri ...... ji" Inscribed on the verso: "Pata Shri ..... ji na manga haro Maharanaji Shri Jawan Singhji ... haro"
Dimensions: 213.0 h x 318.0 w cm
Acknowledgement: Purchased 1993
Accession No: NGA 93.734
  • The supplied chain of ownership for this object is being reviewed and further research is underway. The provenance information listed has been substantiated by documentation. Details may be refined and updated as research progresses. (added 2016)
  • in a private collection, India, until c. 1967 (details to be confirmed)
  • in another private collection, Europe, until 1990 (details to be confirmed)
  • in a third private collection, New York, until 1993 (details to be confirmed)
  • with art dealer, New York, 1993
  • who sold it to the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 1993
  • The Hindu rulers of Mewar were known as fierce warriors. In this painting Jawan Singh (ruled 1828–1838) and his party appear at various stages of an imperial hunt in the countryside surrounding Udaipur, the kingdom’s capital. Jawan Singh, identified by his golden halo, appears nine times in the picture, which illustrates successive occurrences simultaneously, and using multiple points of perspective. Events include an antelope sacrifice, the ruler’s visit to a Hindu temple and a ceremonial gathering in a red tent. On a number of occasions Jawan Singh and some members of his party wear green, a colour associated with ritual hunts.

    Mewar rulers began to commission large, activity-filled paintings on cloth during the reign of Maharana Sangram Singh II (1690–1734, ruled 1710–34), approximately a century before this image was painted.

    Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2011
    From: Asian gallery extended display label