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Pacific gallery See nearby items (accurate to +/- 12 hrs)
ON DISPLAY
LVL 1
Huon Gulf - West New Britain cultural and style region Mask from the Huon Gulf region c. 19th century Place made: Huon Gulf, Papua New Guinea Melanesia
Materials & Technique: costume and dress, masks, wood, ochres
Dimensions: 54.0 h x 24.0 w x 19.0 d cm
Acknowledgement: Purchased 2011
Accession No: NGA 2011.948

MORE DETAIL

  • This ancient mask’s presence is undoubted, threatening, bordering on the spiritual. It comes from a time before there were written records in Papua New Guinea. The style of the mask, however, originates from the nausung masks from the Kilenge region of west New Britain, the easternmost part of a region that extends westward to the Huon Gulf of mainland New Guinea. This is an area of great mobility, with trade links connecting many islands.

    In the neighbouring Astrolabe Bay, wood figures were depicted with war rattles protruding from their mouths, but here the mouth comprises two fleshy pierced tongues joined at the tip, perhaps a physical expression of words, a concept too dreadful to utter. These were words to a boy in the midst of a major change in his life, as this type of mask was used during circumcision, when boys were taken from their mothers to become men.

    Only the eyes of the circumciser wearing the mask would have been visible; his body concealed by leaves, a knife in his hands. The asymmetrical appearance of the face helps create the impression that the mask is a living being. However, viewer’s eyes are continually drawn back to the mouth, with a gaping hole burnt through the teeth, and its bizarre bifurcated tongue.

    Michael Gunn Senior Curator, Pacific Arts


    in artonview, issue 71, Spring 2012

  • This ancient mask’s presence is undoubted, threatening, bordering on the spiritual. It comes from a time before there were written records in Papua New Guinea. The style of the mask, however, originates from the nausung masks from the Kilenge region of West New Britain, the easternmost part of a region that extends westward to the Huon Gulf of mainland New Guinea. This is an area of great mobility, with trade links connecting many islands.

    In neighbouring Astrolabe Bay, wood figures were depicted with war rattles protruding from their mouths, but here the mouth comprises two fleshy pierced tongues joined at the tip, perhaps a physical expression of words, a concept too dreadful to utter. These were words meant for a boy in the midst of a major change in his life, as this type of mask was used during circumcision, when boys were taken from their mothers to become men.

    Only the eyes of the circumciser wearing the mask would have been visible; his body concealed by leaves, a knife in his hands. The asymmetrical appearance of the face helps create the impression that the mask is a living being. However, viewer’s eyes are continually drawn back to the mouth, with a gaping hole burnt through the teeth, and its bizarre bifurcated tongue.


    Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2014
    From: Collection highlights: National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2014