HOGARTH AND ERICHSEN & CO, Bracelet Enlarge 1 /2
  1. 218545.jpg 1/2
  2. 218545_A.jpg 2/2

HOGARTH AND ERICHSEN & CO

commenced 1852 /1856 – 1859 /1863

(organisation)

Bracelet c.1858 Place made: Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Materials & Technique: jewellery, gold, photograph on paper Support: fitted case

Dimensions: 2.0 h x 18.0 w x 4.5 d cm
Acknowledgement: Purchased 2012
Accession No: NGA 2012.1010

Hogarth, Erichsen & Co’s work is distinguished by its confident use of expensive materials, refined craftsmanship and extravagant use of Australian flora and fauna motifs. Such imagery is expressed in the Rococo revival styles of the mid nineteenth century, and works such as this bracelet fuelled a burgeoning pride in Australian achievement and identity, its unique flora and fauna and its plentiful gold.

Such objects were often exported to display this wealth abroad, and this intricate bracelet may have been such a piece, having been discovered in Scotland. Its linked elements feature south-eastern Australian flora—waratah, native pear, banksia, fern and spider orchid—while a parrot decorates a raised domed locket, which opens to reveal a glass-covered photographic portrait of an unknown man.

Julius Hogarth was born as Julius Hougaard in Copenhagen in Denmark in 1820. He studied sculpture in Copenhagen under Danish Neo-Classicist sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen. He also trained as a goldsmith, engraver and diesinker. He arrived in Sydney on 11 December 1852, was naturalised in 1856 and died in Sydney on 5 March 1879.

Conrad E Erichsen was born in Norway around 1825 and trained there as a goldsmith. He arrived on the same ship as Hogarth, joining him in the partnership Hogarth, Erichsen & Co in Sydney in 1854. They operated together until the firm’s insolvency in 1861.

Hogarth re-established himself in 1861 and moved to Melbourne in 1866, working for various jewellery and medallist firms before returning to Sydney in 1878. Hogarth, in partnership with Erichsen and later on his own, received important government and Vice-Regal commissions, along with prizes awarded for jewellery and silver works submitted for international and inter-colonial exhibitions.

Robert Bell AM Senior Curator, Decorative Arts and Design


in artonview, issue 72, Summer 2012/13

Hogarth, Erichsen & Co’s work is distinguished by its confident use of expensive materials, refined craftsmanship and extravagant use of motifs of Australian flora and fauna. Such imagery is expressed in the Rococo revival styles of the mid-nineteenth century, and works such as this bracelet fuelled a burgeoning pride in Australian achievement and identity.

This intricate bracelet was discovered in Scotland, where it may have been exported as an example of Australia’s great wealth and prospects. Its linked elements feature south-eastern Australian flora—waratah, native pear, banksia, fern and spider orchid—while a parrot decorates a raised domed locket, which opens to reveal a glass-covered photographic portrait of an unknown man.

Julius Hogarth arrived in Sydney from Denmark on 11 December 1852. Conrad E Erichsen arrived on the same ship as Hogarth, joining him in the partnership Hogarth, Erichsen & Co in Sydney in 1854. They operated together until the firm’s insolvency in 1861. Hogarth, in partnership with Erichsen and later on his own, received important government and vice-regal commissions, along with prizes awarded for jewellery and silver works submitted for international and inter-colonial exhibitions.


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2014
From: Collection highlights: National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2014