Godfrey MILLER, Blue Unity Enlarge 1 /1

Godfrey MILLER

Wellington, New Zealand 1893 – Paddington, New South Wales, Australia 1964

  • Asia 1918-19
  • Australia 1919-29
  • England 1929-31
  • Australia 1931-33
  • England, Greece, Middle East 1933-39
  • Australia from 1939

Blue Unity 1954-55 Place made: Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Materials & Technique: paintings, oil on canvas

Primary Insc: signed l.r., pen and ink,'Godfrey miller'. not dated
Dimensions: 69.8 h x 88.2 w cm framed (overall) 71.6 h x 90.0 w x 4.2 d cm
Acknowledgement: Purchased 1969
Accession No: NGA 69.53
Image rights: © John Henshaw Trust

Godfrey Miller was born in New Zealand, where he studied architecture until his enlistment in the New Zealand Army in the First World War. Wounded at Gallipoli, he returned to New Zealand where he completed his studies. In 1920 he moved to Australia and began his career as an artist.

After travelling and studying in Europe during the 1930s Miller returned to Sydney at the onset of the Second World War. While he lived like a recluse, he became an inspirational teacher at the National Art School. Miller’s fascination with esoteric spiritualist theories provided him with a blueprint for the conduct of his art and life. Miller worked painstakingly slowly, often spending years on one painting before he considered it finished. He painted with a geometric precision to create mosaic-like images with a pulsating sense of life and the suggestion that everything in the universe coexists or interconnects.


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2010
From: Ron Radford (ed), Collection highlights: National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2008

Godfrey Miller was born in New Zealand, where he studied architecture until his enlistment in the New Zealand Army in the First World War. Wounded at Gallipoli, he returned to New Zealand where he completed his studies. In 1920 he moved to Australia and began his career as an artist.

After travelling and studying in Europe during the 1930s Miller returned to Sydney at the onset of the Second World War. While he lived like a recluse, he became an inspirational teacher at the National Art School. Miller’s fascination with esoteric spiritualist theories provided him with a blueprint for the conduct of his art and life. Miller worked painstakingly slowly, often spending years on one painting before he considered it finished. He painted with a geometric precision to create mosaic-like images with a pulsating sense of life and the suggestion that everything in the universe coexists or interconnects.


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2014
From: Collection highlights: National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2014