Jimmy PIKE, Japingka waterhole Enlarge 1 /1

Jimmy PIKE

Walmajarri people

Japingka, Great Sandy Desert, Western Australia 1938 – Broome, Kimberley, Western Australia, Australia 2002

Japingka waterhole 1986 Place made: Great Sandy Desert, Western Australia, Australia
Materials & Technique: paintings, synthetic polymer paint on composition board

Dimensions: 128.0 h x 189.0 w cm
Acknowledgement: Purchased 1987
Accession No: NGA 87.1549
Image rights: © Pat Lowe

Japingka waterhole encapsulates only one of the several media Pike used, and in many ways is most akin to the plan or aerial view of country that is the norm in Indigenous painting from the Western Desert. Pike also depicted both country and people actual or mythological in a panoramic and naturalistic fashion in paintings, screenprints and linocuts. There is even a small body of sculptural work in stone.

While vibrant use of acrylic paints was occasionally found in Western Desert art of the 1970s, often decorating artefacts such as shields or coolamons, collectors generally sought works executed in the more traditional suite of colours in ochres: red and yellow, black and white. Pike launched a whole new palette in ways that would confound the purists of the time. His use of almost fluorescent blues, greens, yellows and reds, and virtual abandonment of the iconography usually associated with Western Desert art, was crucial in taking Indigenous art in another direction, into the wider application of contemporary Indigenous imagery in the commercial world of fabrics and fashion design. Jimmy’s work was to feature ultimately on catwalks, as well as in galleries around Australia and in London, Tokyo and Beijing.

Japingka waterhole 1986 reinforces Pike’s abilities as a colourist and, more importantly, his continual contact with his country not only because the place is itself an important ceremonial site whose origins are grounded in the complex mythology of the region, but also because it is the major site with which he is associated by birth.

Kim Akerman


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2010
From: Franchesca Cubillo and Wally Caruana (eds) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art: collection highlights National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2010

吉米·派克 (Jimmy PIKE)
澳大利亚西澳州大沙沙漠
《加平卡水洼》(Japingka waterhole)
1986年
复合板,合成聚合物涂料
128.0(高) x 189.0(宽)厘米
1987年购买
收录号:NGA 87.1549

《加平卡水洼》展示的仅仅是派克使用的几种介质之一,在许多方面几乎近似于乡村的平面或鸟瞰图,是来自西部沙漠土著绘画的典型做法。在绘画、丝网印刷和浮雕作品中,派克还使用全景和自然手法描绘真实或神话中的乡村和人物;甚至还有一部分石头雕刻作品。

1970年代西部沙漠艺术中偶有发现鲜亮丙烯颜料的使用,常常装饰诸如盾或浅木制或树皮制盛水盘之类的人工制品,收藏家一般寻找用更传统的赭石套色:红与黄、黑与白所制作的艺术品。派克启用了一整套新的调色板,其手法会令当时的纯粹主义者惊愕。他使用接近荧光的蓝色、绿色、黄色和红色色调,实际放弃了常与西部沙漠艺术相关的图腾,在将土著艺术引向另一个方向上发挥了重要作用,在纺织品和时尚设计风行的商界广泛应用当代土著意象。吉米的艺术作品必将最终点亮T型台,也会被全澳大利亚以及伦敦、东京和北京等地的美术馆收藏。

《加平卡水洼》创作于1986年,增强了派克色彩大师的技能,更重要的是,巩固了他与家乡之间的持续联系,不仅因为这片土地本身是重要的仪式现场,其起源基于该地区复杂的神话,还因为这是与他出生相关的重要场所。

Kim Akerman
金姆·阿克曼


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra