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Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art
Desert Painting from 1975 gallery See nearby items (accurate to +/- 12 hrs)
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Clifford POSSUM TJAPALTJARRI

Anmatyerr people

Australia 1932 – 2002

Warlugulong 1977 synthetic polymer paint, oil and natural earth pigments on canvas synthetic polymer paint, oil and natural earth pigments on canvas
202.0 h x 337.5 w cm
Purchased with the generous assistance of Roslynne Bracher and the Paspaley Family, David Coe and Michelle Coe, Charles Curran and Eva Curran, 2007
Accession No: NGA 2007.200
© the estate of the artist licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency Ltd

ENLARGE


  • Warlugulong is the Anmatyerr name for a site 200 kilometres north-west of Alice Springs where, in ancestral times, Lungkata the Blue-Tongue Lizard Man created the first great bushfire. The main significance of this Dreaming or Tjukurrpa lies in the fact that it connects a number of language groups across the western deserts, and it is one of the most important for the artist’s Anmatyerr people. The painting is one of five large canvases Clifford PossumTjapaltjarri produced from 1976 to 1979 to map his ancestral lands and their Tjukurrpa in a way that integrated the sacred diagrams of ceremonial ground paintings and the topographical conventions of European maps. Tjapaltjarri’s templates for this magnum opus are also in the national collection: Bushfire I and Bushfire II both painted in 1972.

    Warlugulong1977, however, is a palimpsest of nine distinct Dreamings. The main subject of the painting is Lungkata’s punishment of his two sons who did not share their catch of kangaroo with their father, as is customary. The skeletons of the two boys are depicted in the atmospheric effect of charred earth, smoke and ash on the right. The orientation of the depiction of this Tjukurrpa places the cardinal point of the east at the top edge of the painting.

    The remaining Tjukurrpa paths are depicted so that the top edge points to the south. In effect, to marry the different orientations, Tjapaltjarri has turned the canvas through 90 degrees. These Dreamings include a group of women from Aileron dancing across the land, represented by their footprints in the top right running laterally across the canvas. Below these are the tracks of a large group of Emus returning to Napperby (the artist’s homeland). The footprints of the Mala or Rock Wallaby Men, travelling north from the area around present-day Port Augusta (in South Australia), can be seen in the vertical line of wallaby tracks to the left of centre. Further to the left are the tracks left by the legendary Chase of the Goanna Men. And the tracks of the Tjangala and Nungurrayi Dingoes travelling to Warrabri appear along the left edge of the painting. The footprints of a Tjungurrayi man who attempted to steal sacred objects run laterally along the lower edge towards a skeleton in the lower left, indicating the man’s fate.

    A family travelling to Ngama is represented by their footprints aligned vertically in the right third of the canvas, while the tracks of Upambura the Possum Man run along the meandering white and yellow lines that provide the compositional structure of the painting.

    Franchesca Cubillo and Wally Caruana


    Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2010
    From: Franchesca Cubillo and Wally Caruana (eds) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art: collection highlights National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2010

  • A founding member of Papunya Tula Artists, Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri was one of the most important artists of the movement, and was among its earliest and most innovative practitioners. Warlugulong is the artist’s most significant work and arguably the most important Indigenous work in the National Gallery of Australia’s collection.

    From 1977 to 1979, Tjapaltjarri made the first attempt by a Western Desert artist to move from smaller boards to majestic canvases, of which Warlugulong is the most significant. This achievement was highly conceptual and led other Papunya Tula artists onto grander scales in their work.

    Tjapaltjarri’s first templates for the five large paintings were made on small boards in 1972. Entitled Bush-fire I and Bush-fire II, these are both held by the National Gallery of Australia.

    Warlugulong is an epic painting, encyclopedic in content and ambition, and it can be read from a number of perspectives, depending on the aspect of the particular Dreaming, or Tjukurrpa, being considered. The canvas contains the essence of five major Tjukurrpa. The main one, Warlugulong (or Bushfire Dreaming), depicts how the ancestral fire began.


    Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2010
    From: Ron Radford (ed), Collection highlights: National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2008

  • A founding member of Papunya Tula Artists cooperative, Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri was one of the most important artists of the movement and among its most innovative practitioners. The Papunya movement began in 1971 when Western Desert men began painting their traditional designs onto small boards—designs that were previously confined to ground and body painting.

    From 1976 to 1979 Tjapaltjarri painted a series of monumental canvases in which he sought to map his ancestral lands and their Tjukurrpa (Dreamings) in a way that integrated the sacred diagrams of ceremonial ground paintings and the topographical conventions of European maps. Warlugulong is one of these paintings. It is epic and encyclopedic in content and ambition, and it can be read from a number of perspectives, depending on the aspect of the particular Tjukurrpa being considered. The canvas features nine major Tjukurrpa: the main one, Warlugulong (or Bushfire Dreaming), depicts the burst of flame that ignited the original fire, created by Lungata, an ancestral man in the guise of a frill-necked lizard. The fire swept across the land chasing Lungata’s errant sons until it engulfed them. Their skeletons and weapons can be seen in the cloud of ash and smoke on the right of the painting. For the depiction of this Tjukurrpa, the top edge of the canvas represents the east: for the other eight Dreamings referred to in this painting, the top edge looks south.


    Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2014
    From: Collection highlights: National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2014

  • 克利福德•袋貂•加帕加瑞 (Clifford POSSUM TJAPALTJARRI)
    澳大利亚北领地西部沙漠
    《沃鲁古龙》(Warlugulong)
    1977年
    帆布材料用合成聚合物涂料、油画颜料和天然土性颜料
    202.00(高) x 337.50(宽) 厘米
    装裱2025(高) x 3385(宽) x 40(深) 毫米
    2007年购买,承蒙罗斯利恩·布拉切尔(Roslynne Bracher)和帕斯巴利(Paspaley)家族、大卫·科(David Coe)和米歇尔·科(Michelle Coe)、查尔斯·科润(Charles Curran)和伊娃·科润(Eva Curran)的慷慨协助
    收录号:NGA 2007.200

    沃鲁古龙是安马泰尔语(Anmatyerr)地名,指艾丽斯斯泉(Alice Springs)西北方向200公里处的地方,祖先时代,伦卡塔(Lungkata)蓝舌蜥蜴人在此引发了第一场丛林大火。该梦幻或朱库尔帕(Tjukurrpa)的主要意义在于它将横跨西部沙漠地区的众多语言部落联系起来的事实,对于艺术家的安马泰尔族人来说,这里是最重要的地方之一。从1976年至1979年,为了绘制祖传土地及其朱库尔帕地图,克利福德·袋貂·加帕加瑞(Clifford PossumTjapaltjarri)使用仪式场地画神圣图案与欧洲地图地形惯例相结合的手法创作了五幅大型帆布画,这幅作品是其中之一。加帕加瑞这幅代表作的范本也进入了国家收藏:《丛林大火之一》(Bushfire I)和《丛林大火之二》(Bushfire II)均创作于1972年。

    然而,创作于1977年的《沃鲁古龙》重现了九个不同梦幻之一;作品主题是伦卡塔(Lungkata)对两个儿子的惩罚,他们没有按照习俗将狩猎回来的袋鼠与父亲分享。画面右侧是两个儿子的骷髅,被弃于焦土、烟雾和灰尘的荒郊野外。画面构图朝向朱库尔帕,从而将东方方位基点固定在画面上沿部分。

    朱库尔帕道路余下部分的描绘使上沿指向南方;实际上,为了配合不同方向,加帕加瑞将帆布旋转了90度。这些梦幻包括一群来自埃勒朗(Aileron)的妇女,她们踏着舞步穿越大地,在帆布右上角留下水平移动的标志性足迹;足迹下方是一群鸸鹋返回艺术家的故乡——那比尔比(Napperby)时留下的痕迹。画面中心左侧可见呈垂直线的小袋鼠足迹,是马拉(Mala)人或岩袋鼠(Rock Wallaby)人的脚印,他们从今天南澳大利亚的奥古斯塔港(Port Augusta)附近的地方向北迁徙。再往左是传说中巨蜥(Goanna)人捕猎留下的足迹;沿画面左侧出现的足迹是加噶拉(Tjangala)和囊古拉依(Nungurrayi)澳洲野狗迁往瓦拉布瑞(Warrabri)时留下的。一个企图盗窃圣物的姜古拉瑞(Tjungurrayi)男子在画面下沿留下了水平方向的足迹,他逃向左下角的一幅骷髅,其下场显而易见。

    帆布右侧三分之一处,呈垂直线的足迹代表迁往噶玛(Ngama)的一家人,而袋貂(Possum)人犹潘布拉(Upambura)的足迹顺着黄白线蜿蜒而行,充满画面结构布局。

    Franchesca Cubillo and Wally Caruana
    弗兰切西卡·库比尤和瓦里·卡鲁阿那


    Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2010